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Why Should Not the Actions of Nature be Translated into Human Language?

30.04.2020
Some modern scientists tend to interpret the coronavirus pandemic as nature's revenge: with the help of viruses, nature “gives us back” for animal cruelty and environmental crisis. However, if you follow the theory proposed by the French philosopher Georges Bataille back in the 1940s, nature should not be confused with man, it does nothing on purpose. Violence committed by nature (such as an earthquake) is sovereign because it does not pursue any goal. Nature acts beyond humans, which also means beyond good and evil.

Do Not Offend the Flies

29.04.2020
What do we know about the virus — is it a living or non-living organism? What methods do we use in order not to get infected (besides forced self-isolation)? Why we do not blame ourselves for the spread of the virus, but animals — bats, rats, marmots, snakes, pangolins? And what is important to understand in order not to be in a state of “bare life”?

Letters Against Separation. Diary of a philosopher Oksana Timofeeva about life in a village during a pandemic

29.04.2020
Being in isolation in the Leningrad Region, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the European University in Saint Petersburg Oksana Timofeeva took part in the online project “Letters Against Separation” — a collective project on the E-flux conversations platform, in which authors from different parts of the world reflect on how Covid-19 influenced them, their loved ones, their cities and their work through a series of short, diary-like letters.

How COVID-19 and Coronavirus Containment Measures Have Exacerbated Problems in Russia's Courts and Prisons

20.04.2020
In an episode of the Meduza's English-language podcast “The Naked Pravda”, Ksenia Runova, junior researcher at the Institute for the Rule of Law at the European University at St. Petersburg, speaks about the problems the Russian prison system faces in connection with the coronavirus epidemic.

EUSP Professor of Public Health and Gender Tells the New York Times about “The Virus Diaries” Initiative

31.03.2020
The New York Times newspaper published an article about how people around the world start keeping their diaries with their experiences of living through a pandemic. Their diaries are told in words and pictures: pantry inventories, window views, questions about the future, concerns about the present. Some diarists record statistics: the number of infections, the number of deaths. Others keep diaries that are part shopping list, part doodle pad.

European University at St. Petersburg switching to distance learning

16.03.2020
The European University at St. Petersburg switches fully to distance learning from March 23, 2020. From March 16 to March 21, 2020, free attendance of classes is introduced. The university will continue research and other work in compliance with all official safety measures.

Open Lecture Series 'Russia: Past and Present'

12.02.2020
We invite international students, young professionals, and expats in St. Petersburg to take part in our new series of open lectures in English on Russia's Past and Present. For six consequent Wednesdays at 18:30 in February and March 2020, EUSP professors and researchers will deliver lectures on Russian history, foreign policy, energy politics, and global affairs. Working language - English   February 19, 2020Use of History in Russian Politics by prof. Ivan Kurilla (in English)

CLEAN ENERGY FORUM 2019

12.11.2019
On November 28th at the Indigo Hotel (17, Tchaikovsky Street, St. Petersburg) the International Forum «Clean Energy» took place. Key topics of the Forum: • Clean energy and energy transition• Best practice of corporate, municipal and national energy and climate strategies • Research agenda for clean energy and sustainable development

GEVORG AVETIKYAN participated in a discussion at Armenia's Parliament

08.11.2019
Dean of EUSP International Programs Dr. Gevorg Avetikyan participated (online) in a discussion on the "Problems of Financing Science in Armenia" which took place on November 6th at the National Assembly (Parliament) of the Republic of Armenia.   MPs, scholars, representatives of research and educational institutions as well as NGOs from Armenia and other countries participated in the debates.

EUSP Open Lecture: The Rise of China and its Regional Hegemonic Prospects

10.10.2019
In earlier work Allan, Vucetic, and Hopf argued that the rise of China was unlikely to be accompanied by Chinese hegemony because of the distribution of identities among the world's great powers. In particular, the only great power in the world with which China's "authoritarian capitalism" resonates is Russia. In this work we extend our analysis to China's more immediate neighborhood. As William Wohlforth argued in 1999, China faces a regional hegemony problem long before it faces a global one.

Hamad Bin Khalifa University Delegation Visits EUSP

07.10.2019
On Monday, October 7, 2019, EUSP hosted a representative delegation from Hamad Bin Khalifa University (Doha, Qatar) and the Embassy of Qatar in Moscow. The head of the delegation Prof. Emad El-Din Shahin, Interim Provost and Dean of the College of Islamic Studies presented the university and noted that EUSP and HBKU have much in common. Both postgraduate schools are relatively young and dynamically developing. HBKU is a member of Qatar Foundation for Education, Science, and Community Development.
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Islam in Russia: Entangled History?

02.10.2019
Russia's regions and republics with Muslim majorities (e.g. Tatarstan/Volga region; Daghestan/North Caucasus),  have traditionally been studied in isolation from each other, with the result that also the particular practices and concepts of Islam have been understood as "national". In recent years scholars and activists have established overarching cupola constructions like "Russian Islam", "Traditionalism" or "Islamic Eurasianism".

Social Science and Russian Studies: Value Added or Obfuscated?

26.09.2019
In Russian/Soviet studies in the West, historians and literature scholars have played central roles. Social scientists, mostly in political science, stepped into the ring after World War II, often pursuing modernization and totalitarian theories whose insights ultimately were overshadowed by errors of logic and fact. Political scientists have returned with useful insights on political economy, voting, and policy-making. But what about sociology-what has it offered in the past, and what can it offer in the future?